Setting outgoing CID Name banned by FCC or Smoke Blowing?

Hello all,

We recently had a PRI from ITC DELTACOM installed in our office. I can set the outgoing number to anything that I want–even numbers that I do not own. However, the CID Name is not working. I have been talking to several tech & the sales rep, but now they say that the FCC bans them from passing whatever name that I want to pass. They say that it is against the law. This makes no sense–I thought that is what the D-Channel allows me to do. Afterall, I can change the number.

Does any one know the truth?

-jimmy

I haven’t heard anything about the FCC banning it. However depending on the telco’s equipment, they may not be able to pass name at all and they may just be making up an excuse. But I dunno.

Caller ID name and caller ID number are 2 separate technolgies. You cannot indiscriminately change your caller ID name. When you place a call, your PRI provider does a lookup in a database and associates the name they have in there with the TN from which you are calling. If you send them a number that isn’t in their database, they will likely default it to the name they have registered with the PRI itself or may leave it blank.

If you want certain numbers to have certain names, you must contact your provider and ask to register those names with the specific numbers.

The caller ID funtion in Asterisk will change the name/number for internal calls. We use this feature a lot. As an example, if an auto-attendant selection is for “Sales,” we set the caller ID to “Sales” when someone selects it - that way the callee can see the word “Sales” on the LCD on their phone and knows that it is a call coming from the attendant rather than a call coming in through their DID.

This is what I know so far…

There is a Bill (H.R. 5126) that has been passed in the House of Representatives called the “Truth in Caller ID Act of 2006”…

govtrack.us/data/us/bills.te … /h5126.pdf

It appears that is not illegal to change caller id info, unless you are doing it "with the intent to defraud or cause harm."

Can anyone tell me what provider that they are using that is allowing them to change the name as needed/wanted?

Please see…

govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=h109-5126

Did you read my response above? It give a clear picture as to how caller ID name works.

Yes I did see your thoughts on the subject, and maybe your correct. I know that there are several callerid spoofing services, and I am pretty sure that I have seen post about people sending the name in addition too number.

Our rep’s serivce guy even said that it was possiable, but now they are saying that it changed about 9 months ago.

It appears that is not illegal to change caller id info, unless
you are doing it “with the intent to defraud or cause harm.”

Can anyone give me an example of a reason for generating a false caller ID number, other than “intent to defraud”?

If you don’t want me to see the number you’re calling from, turn caller ID off, but don’t lie to me about it.

I can give a couple…

  1. A call center that needs to place a call on behalf of a client, by changing the name/number to let the customer know that the call is from the client

  2. We want to patch calls out to external numbers when we are not in the office, and I would like to prepend a letter or two to the name before patching to my house, so that I know that the call is routing through the office

Well you can give “False” numbers for very legit reasons. You may be a calling center in india, but all callerID info may say texas - you are not defrauding…

Well you can give “False” numbers for very legit reasons. You may
be a calling center in india, but all callerID info may say texas

Good afternoon, danursuline.

Sorry, bad example. If a vendor or manufacturer makes a practice of outsourcing its tech support to India, I want to (and am entitled to) know about it.

Around here we make a lot of purchasing decisions that are partially based on things like that. In any case, companies aren’t entitled to try to fool us into thinking they’re providing American jobs for American citizens or legal residents in Texas.

Responding to puckett_jw’s notes:

  1. A call center that needs to place a call on behalf of a
    client, by changing the name/number to let the customer
    know that the call is from the client

I think that 99.9999 percent of the reasons for doing that are as indicated above… either the client is outsourcing its call center work to India and wants to try to fool its customers into thinking it’s not doing that, or it’s trying to spoof caller ID as a means of hiding from telemarketing laws and Do Not Call lists.

If companies are going to send American jobs overseas, at least they need to be open and above-board and honest about it.

As for telemarketers, I don’t want them to be able to hide their violations of federal law … let them turn off their caller IDs if they don’t have the courage to show who they really are, and my phone system will make its appropriate response to incoming calls that don’t have caller ID information.

  1. We want to patch calls out to external numbers when we
    are not in the office, and I would like to prepend a letter or
    two to the name before patching to my house, so that I
    know that the call is routing through the office

Uhhh … yeah, I suppose … seems like a bit of a stretch and my guess is that a tiny fraction of 1 percent of all of the caller ID spoofing that goes on is for reasons like that.

Now, having taken this thread in a completely off-topic direction, I will apologize for doing that and am happy to make this my last post on this topic unless anyone asks me direct questions that need responses.

I don’t have a problem with restricting caller ID name delivery. My carrier does not allow me to set it. I do, however, want to be able to set my caller id number.

We have multiple companies sharing the same PRI and need to be able to set caller ID according to the company. Furthermore, I forward calls to cell phones and don’t want our caller ID showing up. I want to know who is calling me.

Sorry if this considered defrauding by some people.

Most providers just reject the caller ID name. The way it works is the terminating provider (i.e. if you are calling a verizon landline then verizon) looks up in its own data base the number and displays the name that it has on record.

I stated this 9 posts ago. This thread is deteriorating into the kind of thing I expect to see in AOL “news” groups. I think the issues are clear and everyone should move on.

My main one use of spoofing is one I have at my medical office. We have one main incoming line and 4 additional trunks that are in the hunt group. When we dial out from one of those trunks, people often call us back on that line from the CID. The problem is, when there is urgent business I need to talk to my staff about, I call on a “back line” that the staff knows is me or my wife. Even worse, at night we forward the main line rather than forwarding 5 lines to the answering service (which must all be unforwarded in the morning); if the patient calls on a secondary line, they get the voicemail rather than the answering service. If it’s urgent, they can’t get hold of me. This is potentially life-threatening in my business.

I’ve also worked at multiple offices and hospitals with the same problem, where people’s calls got routed to the wrong departments because of the caller ID issue.

I suppose once we switch to VoIP and have AA/IVR, it won’t be as big a deal as they will get the attendant regardless. But for the sake of uniformity, I don’t want my patients trying to memorize 4-5 different numbers for our office, they should just have to commit ONE to memory.

David Ahn, MD

I’m sorry to bust the bubble here but most of you seem to be missing the main reason most people want to spoof their callerID.

You’re having an affair with a married person and you want the calls you make to them look like their coming from somewhere besides your residence…

You don’t want your girlfiriend to know you’re back from a business trip and just need her to keep thinking you’re on the road…

You want the person you’re calling to think you’re somewhere other than where you really are…

C’mon guys. This may very well be considered fraud but you’re not ripping anyone off or stealing by doing it. Not everyone spoofing their callerID is a crook or a terrorist.