Is this possible?


#1

A friend of mine runs a doctors office (he is a doctor). He is thinking about installing Asterisk in order to replace his 5 office phones. He is paying about $600/month of phone bills and hopes Asterisk will lower his bills dramatically.

This is what he wants:

Get a mini PC with Linux and Asterisk running and connected to a PBX wireless router. Replace all of the 5 phones with Internet (Cisco perhaps) phones and connect them all into that PBX router with ethernet cables or even better somehow connect them wirelessly into the router (how can he do that?).

He also wants the “press 1 for sales… press 2 for support…” auto attendant system.

Also if possible he wants to do all this without the server and phone system being connected into the internet at all for the risk of being hacked. It would just be an intranet with the only out going connection is that single landline.

Basically all he wants is to connect his current landline phone (only one) wire into the Asterisk server/pc which subsquently would be connected wirelessly to each phone through that PBX router. So there would be zero access to the internet.

My question: Is this all possible? More importantly, would it dramatically lower the telephone costs? What hardware is required.

I was looking at this for the router: compusa.com/products/product … pfp=SEARCH

Thank you. I look foward to your advice.


#2

What you are indicating is simple for Asterisk. With the number of phones you indicated and theminimal Autoattendant options this is a very simple installation. You can also save yourself some trouble and buy Asterisk in a prepackaged system. There are a number of them out there but I recommend IBeX (http://www.finite-tech.com/ibex) which is produced by by the company I work for.

It is always better to have a packaged system, phones are a sensitive thing when they go down and people tend to not accept excuses. Have a vendor that can package and support a product can be areal life saver.


#3

metallic07039,
yes, all these is possible with asterisk. there are wireless phone as well as cable ones.
external phone can be connected with fxo-fxs device.
you can read voip-info.org/ for detailed explanations and make everything on your own or hire an asterisk consultant to setup everything


#4

Sorry but “Home wireless” gear does not meet HIPPA rules

There is a whole bunch of rules which come in to play when you add wireless to a Dotors network.

You would need third party tools

WPA is weaker than WEP as for as cracking it.

google Cracking WPA / or wireless + Hippa


#5

HIPPA is always fun and I agree that normal 802.11 gear will not work.

One of the things you could do is use a traditional alaog phone that will meet the requirments and connect it to the system via an ATA.


#6

[quote=“scott”]What you are indicating is simple for Asterisk. With the number of phones you indicated and theminimal Autoattendant options this is a very simple installation. You can also save yourself some trouble and buy Asterisk in a prepackaged system. There are a number of them out there but I recommend IBeX (http://www.finite-tech.com/ibex) which is produced by by the company I work for.

It is always better to have a packaged system, phones are a sensitive thing when they go down and people tend to not accept excuses. Have a vendor that can package and support a product can be areal life saver.[/quote]

It doesn’t look like they sell software. If im correct they sell the whole system including the server itself.

How much does that system go for?


#7

Ok forget the wireless. If we just replace the main analog phone line that currently goes into the phones and all of the phones. Can I do that with an Asterisk box and one of those converters?


#8

The bottom line is yes you can do this.

I would use an Asterisk based server and IP phones. I prefer the Polycom IP600’s but you can use almost any SIP based phone.

Then add an ATA for any analog phones.

From there you just need to configure the system and you are off and running.


#9

[quote=“scott”]The bottom line is yes you can do this.

I would use an Asterisk based server and IP phones. I prefer the Polycom IP600’s but you can use almost any SIP based phone.

Then add an ATA for any analog phones.

From there you just need to configure the system and you are off and running.[/quote]

Scott, i’d like to thank you and others for the help thus far.

So with the Polycom IP600 phones, they all have a plan analog type port on the back of them? After I convert the analog phone lines to digital type through the little converter box I could just use the extisting lines for the VoIP?


#10

The Polycom phones are an IP based phone, they only do IP. If you want to maintain the analog phones and move to Asterisk then you need to have an ATA for each analog phone.

I wouldn’t use an analog phone unless I had no choice. Most IP phones come with a 2 port ethernet switch in them so you unplug the pc plug it into the phone, the phone into the wall.

You need to decide if you are going to keep the analog phones or replace them with IP phones.


#11

I think we can probably keep the current phones but maybe keep one for the main office with the screen which from what I heard uses XML for the screen. I think we can set it up to display come information on there just for fun, right? Otherwise, im thinking we would keep the phones because we would need to drill wholes for ethernet wires and it would become a mess.

So my next question is do you think this would lower telephone costs? By people calling the same phone line but being split up by extentions seems like it would only get rid of the per line cost but still be charged by the minute, correct? So if 5 lines are talking it would be 5 x the per minute fee or would it be 1 x the per minute fee since its on one phone number?

Thanks again!


#12

I had assumed you already had computers and Ethernet wires where you were planning the phones. If not then it is normally brest to locate the ATA’s in the wire closet.

You can also get analog ports to go in the Asterisk box but I have always had little issues with this configuration. I always put the analog on ATA’s.

As for the cost per minute comment, this doesn’t amke any sense. You have a couple of shared lines to the PSTN, you don’t pay by the minute for this and the phone system doesn’t charge but the minute. The only thing that costs perminute is the long distance and you can by this cheap if you use braodband to access your long distance.

One other thing to keep in mind is that people have no sense of humor when there phones are not working. If you use cheap hardware and take a cheap approach it will always impact the quality of the phone system. Choose the core hardware well and stick with Sipura/Linksys ATA’s.


#13

I guess why im asking is what would happen if say he gaves a call and it goes into phone number (extention) #5 while the call of talking and he gets another call on that same line what would happen?

Could we have more then one phone call at once on one line so all lines (extentions) could be off the hooks and talking to different people?

Or would it just go on call waiting or the person calling would get a busy tone?

The idea is to have many phones on one analog phone line with many phone calls coming in at once.

Would that work?


#14

What will happen to the call on an extension if it is busy is entirely up to the person doing the programming. Typically this would ring a second line appearance on an IP phone and then forward to voicemail or a receptionist. On an ATA they may get a call waiting beep. It is all programming and end equipment dependant.

What and where the calls route is a programming issue and you have complete control.

*** A little shameless plug ***

One of the things that you get from an integrated system like our IBeX (http://www.finite-tech.com/ibex) product is that we have already worked out these issues for you and depending on how you want to handle the project we can even prebuild the system and its configurations for you. Another advantage you get is that when things go wrong you have someone to call to solve the problem, replace hardware, trouble shoot etc. We have also designed our own Linux distribution that has been optimized for this application and our hardware.

We compile all of the Asterisk software and we have our own certification process to determine which releases are available for updates. We also add a number of additional features and a very nice GUI interface system to manage the entire appliance not just Asterisk. You also get Internet updates for not only the OS but all of the software components.

Good luck on your project and let me know.