Hardware cerification project


#1

I also put this in the developers forum but this forum seems more active so I am also adding it here.

I was wondering if there is any interest in starting a hardware certification project. I would be willing to compile a list of tests that people could do voluntarily on their hardware. Not sure what it should and should not include. Maybe there are some open source applications that could be used to aid in the testing.

I figure all that is needed is a downloadable document listing the specific tests. Feedback for each test would consist of pass, fail, value, ?. People could then report the results on a website database


#2

I’m game, but that may be more than you think…

The just the permutations of boot loaders and firmware for the phones alone could lead to a LOT of tests. And every time the phone manufacturers re-release the firmware, you have to re-test everything, and may have to test new functions.

Still, it’s not a bad idea.

Frankly, before I’d do that, I’d be putting together a really simple web site with .conf file libraries.

Something very simple that people could download whole, tested complete .conf files that they could copy to an asterisk box. Just load and go.

And when people want to get frisky and create something REALLY cool, they could post it there too.

I’m sure that the people who make their living configuring Asterisk for those who figure that it’s too hard will be a bit miffed. But it’ll help those who need to get started in a hurry, and having tested formats with a bit of documentation could help them make the changes that they need to make it their own system.


#3

[quote=“dufus”]I’m game, but that may be more than you think…

The just the permutations of boot loaders and firmware for the phones alone could lead to a LOT of tests. And every time the phone manufacturers re-release the firmware, you have to re-test everything, and may have to test new functions.

Still, it’s not a bad idea.

Frankly, before I’d do that, I’d be putting together a really simple web site with .conf file libraries.

Something very simple that people could download whole, tested complete .conf files that they could copy to an asterisk box. Just load and go.

And when people want to get frisky and create something REALLY cool, they could post it there too.

I’m sure that the people who make their living configuring Asterisk for those who figure that it’s too hard will be a bit miffed. But it’ll help those who need to get started in a hurry, and having tested formats with a bit of documentation could help them make the changes that they need to make it their own system.[/quote]

dufus,

I am not proposing that phones be included in the hardware certification. Just the server platform.

There is a site with .conf files. It is the Asterisk wiki. Probably not exactly what you had in mind but it seems to serve that purpose adequately.


#4

Interesting. But what would be the test criteria? Would it just be; It works/does not work? Would it have to support x features to be considered "“certified”? Would a voice/fax card be considered certified if the fax can’t be made to work, but everything else does?

It seems to me that we have abundant working hardware configurations, and that we would be better served by defining limits. Which is, I think, more important than “will this card work, or not?”.

A Pentium III with a lousy 8 gig hard drive can run a digium TDM22B card no problem. (I have one on my desk.)

But could it run a T1? A quad T1? Just two spans on a quad T1? Two spans if you’re building a meet-me conference bridge, but 4 spans if you’re building a calling card application? You’d have to push the configurations until the system crashes to truly know. And again, we get into permutations of config…

You’d need something decent to test the limits of the machines. Like a Hammer empirix.com and unfortunately, those are a bit pricy for my home, or even my office’s, lab…

However, it seems like something that those who build systems for a living would want to know. When a customer asks, “Can you build me an 123 sized system that can do XYZ?”, they should be able to give an intelligent qualified answer.

I doubt that any Asterisk@Home sized machine will ever suffer for power or capacity, but if Asterisk is going to progress into something that businesses can take seriously, someone will have to know the limits.